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Geography isn’t just about knowing your way around a map. 

It’s about knowing your way around our ever-changing world. 

The Department of Geography at the University of Oregon is one of the top ten geography programs in the country. We feature faculty and students researching and teaching about the cutting edge of important societal issues, such as racism, climate change, water resources, economic development, land use, conflict, migration, spatial data science, cartography, and more. We offer two major programs of study, Geography and Spatial Data Science and Technology and a minor in Geography.

The Department of Geography knows that a safe environment free of hate, violence, and discrimination is the right of every student and essential for learning to happen. Along with the rest of campus, our department recognizes and values our responsibility to protect our environment from hate and discrimination in any form. Resources are available to anyone on campus experiencing or witnessing hate or discrimination at respect.uoregon.edu/


UO Geography hosts 2019 Critical Geographies mini-conference

Friday and Saturday, October 18-19, 2019

We are very pleased to announce that the University of Oregon is hosting the 14th Annual Critical Geographies Mini-Conference (formerly known as the Cascadia Critical Geographies Mini-Conference) with the support of the Department of Geography and the College of Arts and Sciences. Consistent with the long-standing goals of this conference, we seek to create a fun, engaging, and friendly atmosphere that embraces an unsettling of the “traditional” conference structure.

Part of the Conference will be held in the Many Nations Longhouse on the

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Meehan and Dietz’s work on plumbing poverty is featured in City Lab

Katie Meehan (now at King’s College in London) and doctoral student Shiloh Dietz recently had an article published in the Annals of the Association of American Geographers called “Plumbing Poverty: Mapping Hot Spots of Racial and Geographic Inequality in U.S. Household Water Insecurity.” This work has focused on mapping access (or lack of it) to running water, flushable toilets, and indoor baths or showers. The results have highlighted the racial, economic, and geographic disparities of what Dietz and Meehan term plumbing poverty.

This work is getting a lot of attention,

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